Interreligious Studies and Intercultural Theology, Vol 2, No 2 (2018)

Plenitudo: Some Implications for a Reappraisal of the Religious Other in Radical Orthodoxy

Angus M. Slater
Issued Date: 9 Oct 2018

Abstract


This article examines the possibility for a re-appraisal of the place and significance of the religious other within the work of the Radical Orthodoxy movement, particularly focused on early work by the central figure of John Milbank and the notion of plenitudo deployed and developed by Michael Hanby. In doing so, the notion of plenitude is identified as a critical part of a possible response to the mode of practice and theological conceptualisation of the religious other presented elsewhere within the Radical Orthodoxy movement, such as in the contemporary work and public engagement of John Milbank. This mode of practice remains overly focused on the end goal of narrative out-narration, undercutting broader commitments to the embodiment of Christian social peace. This article aims to show that this mode of practice currently employed is not a necessary one, and only one malfunctioning possibility among many.

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DOI: 10.1558/isit.36609

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