Latest Issue: Vol 17, No 1-2 (2015) RSS2 logo

Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies

Editor
Chas Clifton, Colorado State University-Pueblo

Letters and Review Editor
Christopher Chase
Send Books for Review to Christopher Chase
402 Catt Hall
Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa 50011-1302

Editor Emeritus
Fritz Muntean, Vancouver

The Pomegranate is the first International, peer-reviewed journal of Pagan studies. It provides a forum for papers, essays and symposia on both ancient and contemporary Pagan religious practices. The Pomegranate also publishes timely reviews of scholarly books in this growing field. The editors seek both new interpretations and re-examinations of those traditions marked both by an emphasis on nature as a source of sacred value (e.g., Wicca, modern Goddess religions) as well as those emphasizing continuity with a polytheistic past (e.g., Ásatrú and other forms of 'reconstructionist' Paganism). The editors also seek papers on the interplay between Pagan religious traditions, popular culture, literature, psychology and the arts.

Indexing and Abstracting
Scopus Abstract and Citation Database
Religious & Theological Abstracts
ISI Web of Knowledge
EBSCO's Academic Search Premier & Religion and Philosophy Collection
European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH Plus)
The American Theological Library Association (ATLA)

Publication and Frequency: May and November
ISSN 1528-0268 (print)
ISSN 1743-1735 (online)

Send Books for Review to
Christopher Chase
402 Catt Hall
Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa 50011-1302

Editor's Blog

 

Pagan-Studies Scholars Tell Their Stories

The new double issue of The Pomegranate is something different. It contains two long papers, but the rest is devoted to a special section on scholarly autobiography conceived and edited by Doug Ezzy (U. of Tasmania). Doug visited Hardscrabble Creek in November 2014 and while holed up in the guest cabin, speed-reading my library, thought […]
Posted: 2016-02-12More...
 

How Do You Wear a Torc?

So you are feeling sort of Iron Age-ish and want to wear your best torc for a night of feasting. Do you go with the twist-on, twist-off style or for the more sophisticated hidden hinge? Let the experts at the British Museum help you with your fashion dilemma. A re-enactor friend of mine has told […]
Posted: 2016-02-11More...
 

New E-book on Germanic Paganism

Norse Revival:Transformations of Germanic Neopaganism, a new book by Stefanie von Schnurbein (Humboldt University, Berlin) appears to be available as a free download from Brill. (Yes, I am using the words free and Brill in the same sentence.) Norse Revival examines international Germanic Neopaganism (Asatru). It investigates its origins in German ultra-nationalist movements around 1900, […]
Posted: 2016-02-10More...
 

Paganism Close Under the Surface

In central and eastern Europe, and maybe elsewhere, there is a tradition to end a group hunt for deer, boar, and other animals with a ceremony. I have never seen the like in America, but then all my hunting has been with individualistic Westerners — which is not to say that sometimes informal rituals are […]
Posted: 2016-02-10More...
 

The Eagles of Candlemas, continued

The first part is here. As I wrote earlier this week, M. and I celebrated Candlemas by going to Eagle Days down at the state park by Pueblo Reservoir.  (Chamber of Commerce types want you to say “Lake Pueblo.”) Scheduling a festival around raptors is a little iffy; you can expect sandhill cranes, for instance, […]
Posted: 2016-02-07More...
 

Core Books in Pagan Studies

I recently completed an article on contempoary Paganism for the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion, so when it appears, I can at least say that I have been published by Oxford UP. Yay me. But is there still a market for academic encyclopedias in this day when undergrads must be taught how to use reference […]
Posted: 2016-02-04More...
 

The Eagles of Candlemas

Paganism is not the religion of the polis, but the polis (loosely defined) can support your Paganism. For the last two days, my Facebook feed has been filling up with people posting electronic clip art to the theme of “Happy Bridget / Imbolc / Candlemas.” Me, I spent three hours today enjoying quality time with […]
Posted: 2016-02-02More...
 

Contemporary Pagan Studies 2016 Call for Papers

Here is our call for papers for the next annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, which will be November 19-22, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas. For all the calls, go here, just in case you are interested in “Vatican II Studies.” Statement of Purpose:  The Contemporary Pagan Studies Group provides a place for […]
Posted: 2016-01-26More...
 

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