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8. Exploring Trajectories towards Social Complexity: Marine Foragers in the Archipelagos of Tierra del Fuego and Norway


 
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1. Title Title of document 8. Exploring Trajectories towards Social Complexity: Marine Foragers in the Archipelagos of Tierra del Fuego and Norway - Marine Ventures
 
2. Creator Author's name, affiliation, country A. Francisco J. Zangrando; Laboratorio de Antropologíia, Centro Austral de Investigaciones Cientíificas, CONICET
 
2. Creator Author's name, affiliation, country Angélica Tivoli; Laboratorio de Antropologíia, Centro Austral de Investigaciones Cientíificas, CONICET
 
2. Creator Author's name, affiliation, country Hein Bjerck; Norwegian university of science and technology (NTNU); Norway
 
2. Creator Author's name, affiliation, country Heidi Breivik; Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
 
2. Creator Author's name, affiliation, country Silje Fretheim; Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU); Norway
 
2. Creator Author's name, affiliation, country Ernesto Piana; Laboratorio de Antropologíia, Centro Austral de Investigaciones Cientíificas, CONICET
 
3. Subject Discipline(s) Archaeology
 
4. Subject Keyword(s) Subarctic and Subantarctic Regions; Fishing; Settlement Patterns; Portable Art
 
6. Description Abstract This paper explores the progressive views that frame the history of marine foragers from simple to complex organizations. Based on the ethnographic and archaeological records of the complex hunter-gatherers in the Northwest Coast of North America, three evidences are normally discussed to recognize complexity: Settlement patterns, decoration on portable objects and fishing intensification. This paper compares these archaeological measures between the Northwest Coast and two other landscapes with similar natural settings: The marine hunter-gatherers in Mesolithic Norway and the Beagle Channel in southernmost Argentina. Since the criteria used to assess the archaeological record vary between regions and scientific traditions, the evaluations of changes towards complexity are many-sided and ambiguous. In this paper the following arguments are supported: 1. Structural changes are not always seen in settlement patterns among these societies and when these changes are observed in some areas, they do not reach the same archaeological measures as identified for the Northwest Coast; 2. Structural changes in settlement patterns are not always accompanied by changes in other social complexity markers (e.g. art production, fishing intensification, etc.); 3. Social complexity is not the only condition for the production of decorated artefacts; 4. Not all high latitude marine hunter-gatherers that intensified fish resources may classify as 'complex' or ‘semi-sedentary’ societies.
 
7. Publisher Organizing agency, location Equinox Publishing Ltd
 
8. Contributor Sponsor(s)
 
9. Date (YYYY-MM-DD) 01-Nov-2016
 
10. Type Status & genre Peer-reviewed Article
 
11. Type Type
 
12. Format File format PDF
 
13. Identifier Uniform Resource Identifier https://journals.equinoxpub.com/books/article/view/24571
 
14. Identifier Digital Object Identifier 10.1558/equinox.24571
 
15. Source Journal/conference title; vol., no. (year) Equinox eBooks Publishing; Marine Ventures
 
16. Language English=en en
 
18. Coverage Geo-spatial location, chronological period, research sample (gender, age, etc.) international,
neolithic; historical;
 
19. Rights Copyright and permissions Copyright 2014 Equinox Publishing Ltd